Gambia’s erratic and delusional dictator Yahya Jammeh has accuses western pharmaceutical companies of spearheading a coordinated “conspiracy theory” by doubting his claim of discovering the cure for HIV, the virus which scientists say causes aids. Mr. Jammeh made the accusations on Monday, in Kanilai, his home village, where traditional herbalists converged to commemorate Gambia’s traditional medicine day. “When I discovered the cure for HIV/AIDS, western pharmaceutical companies teamed up to undermine my treatment program. The drug companies felt insure because of my discovery to cure aids. We have successfully treated the virus that cause aids. But western pharmaceutical companies felt that they would be out of business if my aids cure findings reaches critical mass. Hence, they decided to sponsor all kinds of propaganda to cast doubt and aspersion on my aids treatment program,” Jammeh said.

“Traditional medicine works perfectly well. Prior to the advent of modern medicine, when our people become sick, they are treated locally. We will continue to promote traditional medicine in this country,” Jammeh added.

The controversial Gambian dictator donated four hundred thousand dalasi to the local traditional healers, who were present in Kanilai to observe the day. He also encouraged local bush doctors to continue to provide treatment in their respective communities.

Different types of locally made medicines were displayed at the site show. Health Minister Omar Sey hailed Jammeh’s HIV/AIDS treatment program.

Also speaking at the gathering was Dr. Tamsir Mbowe, the Director of Jammeh’s HIV/AIDS treatment program. Mbowe noted that a significant success story has been recorded since the advent of Jammeh’s aids treatment program. He claimed that over nine thousand patients have been treated so far by dictator Jammeh, the majority of whom he said were HIV patients. Mr. Mbowe added that Jammeh’s treatment program would be expanded in the New Year. He said other diseases would be included in the treatment program.

Join The Conversation