Gambians, who shipped food stuffs and cooking materials to their loved ones, ahead of the month of Ramadan, will have to wait for some time (only God knows when) before they would be able to clear their shipments at the Banjul Port, as there is no functional ramp at this time, the Freedom Newspaper can reveal.  Over three thousand (3000) barrels filled with food stuff, cooking utensils, clothes, and drinks are currently stranded at the seaport in Banjul. The shipments originate from the United States, the United Kingdom, and elsewhere in Europe.

The main ramp that should facilitate the unloading of the containers has been reported faulty. Reports have it that some part of the ramp fell into the river, and could not be recovered. Banjul lacks the technical know how or expertise to recover the ramp. People are being told that a South African, has been billed to come to The Gambia, to help recover and fix the ramp.

According to sources, each time that local Gambian clearing agents, showed up at the port to clear their containers, they are usually told by the Port staff that the ramp is out of services. The lack of ramp has created confusion as families stormed the warehouses of the shipping representatives in The Gambia, demanding to receive their shipped barrels.

A Freedom Radio Gambia listener in a text message to this Editor said: “Good afternoon Pa. How are you? Happy Ramadan. I am one of your fans, who listens to the radio.  Last Sunday, you were talking about the food stuff Gambians are sending back home for the Ramadan. Guess what? The ramp at the Gambia Ports is broken. Over three thousand (3,000) barrels Gambians sent to their families is stuck at the ports.  I spoke to some of my friends and their families are so upset about what happened. Please investigate about it. God bless you. Thanks.”

“One of my sources told me that when he asked about the broken ramp, he was told that the person who should fix the ramp, should be travelling from South Africa and they don’t know when,” he added.

Besides the ramp problem confronting the Banjul Port Authority (GPA), the port is also struggling with an infrastructural collapse. Almost all the bridges and docks built by the former Jawara administration are in bad shape.  

Written By An Editor

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