The exiled Gambian dictator Yahya Jammeh, has been accused of stealing over $11 million United States dollars, days before his departure from the impoverished West African country. The accusations were made Mai Fatty, a Gambian lawyer, who is also a member of the Transition government. “As we take over the new government, the Gambia is in financial distress. Within a period of two weeks alone, nearly D500 million dalasi was withdrawn from the Central Bank by the former president. That’s a lot of money,” Mr. Fatty told reporters in Dakar, during a press conference.

Mr. Fatty said efforts are being made to quantify the exact amount of money stolen by Jammeh. He alleged that Mr. Jammeh left the country with a huge amount of money.

“The coffers are virtually empty. It has been confirmed by the officials of the Ministry of Finance and the Central Bank of the Gambia that Jammeh left with over $11 million dollars,” Fatty added.

Mr. Fatty is the leader of the opposition—Gambia Moral Party. He was part of the opposition alliance, which paved the way for president Adama Barrow’s electoral victory.

Outgoing dictator Yahya Jammeh, who is now living in Equatorial Guinea, with his wife, mum and some bodyguards, also took some of his luxurious cars along. A Chadian Cargo plane, has shuttling between Chad and Banjul, to collect Jammeh’s cars. 

Mr. Mai Fatty said the new government has given orders to the airport authorities not to allow Jammeh’s properties to leave the country. Fatty accuses Jammeh of paralyzing the country economically.  

Yahya Jammeh came to power through a coup, in July of 1994. He retired from the army in 1996. He then set up the APRC political party and won the 1996 elections. He has since been winning elections, which were widely disputed by the opposition and the international community.

On December, 1st, 2016, Jammeh was defeated by Adama Barrow, a virtually unknown Real Estate Developer, in an election widely regarded as free and fair. He earlier conceded defeated, and later rescinded his concession speech—alleging voter irregularity and fraud.

Following mounting press both local and international, coupled with threats of ECOWAS invasion ,Jammeh decided to step down. He left The Gambia on Saturday for Guinea Conakry, where he briefly made a stopover before proceeding to his new home Equatorial Guinea. 

Written By Pa Nderry M’Bai

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