Former Junta Vice Chairman Sana Bairo Sabally, is determined to fulfill his longstanding ambition of becoming a medical doctor, the Freedom Newspaper can reveal. Mr. Sabally, is gradually assimilating into the German’s culture, and has landed himself a new nursing job. He is now a trained Nurse attendant; hoping that one day he will become a medical doctor, the German online paper reported. “I feel very comfortable and safe in Germany. I cannot go back to The Gambia. Germany is my new home. And with my training at HELIOS, I have come a long way closer to my desire to become a doctor,” Sabally said.

Mr. Sabally, who is 50 years of age, comes from a family of twenty siblings. He has been linked to crimes against humanity. Under his watch as the Junta’s number two man, Sabally supervised and participated in the torture and killing of dozens of army officers on November 11th, 1994. He later parted company with the junta after he was accused of plotting a coup against the military dictatorship. He was jailed for nine years and released. He fled to neighboring Senegal, where he stayed for some time before migrating to Germany.

Mr. Sabally married a German woman, whose job is counselling asylum seekers in Germany. The German lady assisted him to resettle in Germany.

Mr. Sabally has been granted residency in Germany, and is illegible to adjust his status to German citizenship

When asked if there is something that he does not like so much about Germany, he laughs: “I do not like the cold in the winter at all!”

The number of Gambians applying for asylum in Germany has increased dramatically in recent years. According to information provided by the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) in 2012, this figure rose to 2447 in 2014. Of these, only two percent have received a so-called “protection status” in Germany. Sana-Bairo Sabally is one of the few who could stay. His three children live in Gambia and work there as a nurse, architect and computer scientist. Until now they have been spared from reprisals of the regime, the paper reported.

Below is the Google Translate of the German online paper’s reporting: 

The life history of the 50-year-old Sana-Bairo Sabally is a history of hope, deception, despair, flight and new beginnings. Growing up in a family of 20 children in the West African Gambia, his greatest wish was to become a doctor. But he also wanted to fight corruption in his country and participated in 1994 with a handful of soldiers at the coup. He was first deputy vice president, a short time later condemned as a state enemy and put in jail for nine years. Shortly after his release, an assassination attempt was made, which is why he fled to Germany via Senegal and applied for asylum in 2008. 

Finally, he was able to complete a one-year nursing assistant training in Langensteinbach. Since 2013, further training at the HELIOS Educational Center in Pforzheim has followed the state-approved health and nursing staff. “I feel very comfortable and safe in Germany. I can not go back to Gambia, Germany is my new home, “says the 50-year-old Sana-Bairo Sabally. “And with my training at HELIOS, I have come a long way closer to my desire to become a doctor,” he says with a wink. 

When asked if there is something that he does not like so much about Germany, he laughs: “I do not like the cold in the winter at all!” The number of Gambians applying for asylum in Germany has increased dramatically in recent years , According to information provided by the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) in 2012, this figure rose to 2447 in 2014. Of these, only two percent have received a so-called “protection status” in Germany. Sana-Bairo Sabally is one of the few who could stay. His three children live in Gambia and work there as a nurse, architect and computer scientist. Until now they have been spared from reprisals of the regime.

Join The Conversation